Celiac Plexus Block

Celiac Plexus Block Treatment in Jackson, MS

A celiac plexus block may be needed to manage extreme abdominal pain resulting from various conditions. Celiac plexus block treatment is available at Jackson Pain Center. We are conveniently located at 1190 North State Street, Suite 102,  Jackson, MS 39202. Contact us for more information.

Celiac Plexus Block Treatment in Jackson, MS
Celiac Plexus Block Treatment in Jackson, MS

Table of Contents:

What is a celiac plexus block?
What does a celiac plexus block treat?
When will I have a celiac plexus block?
What steps should I take to prepare for a celiac plexus block?
What happens during a celiac plexus block?

What is a celiac plexus block?


Pain relief is provided by celiac plexus blocks, which are injected into the abdomen. In this treatment, the celiac plexus nerves are prevented from transmitting pain messages to the brain.

People with pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis are treated with celiac plexus blocks. Severe abdominal pain can result from these conditions.

What does a celiac plexus block treat?


As part of the nervous system, the celiac plexus is located. The aorta, the largest blood vessel in the body, lies behind the pancreas in the upper abdomen.

Digestive system organs send signals to the brain and spinal cord through celiac plexus nerves.

Patients with severe abdominal pain caused by pancreatic cancer can benefit from a celiac plexus block. It is possible for cancerous tumors to put pressure on the celiac plexus, causing pain.

The celiac plexus block may also be necessary for people suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is caused by inflammation (swelling) of the pancreas.

When will I have a celiac plexus block?


Celiac plexus blocks are outpatient procedures that relieve pain for many people. During treatment for pancreatic cancer, it may occur at any time.

A celiac plexus block may also be performed during surgery or during an endoscopic ultrasound.

A celiac plexus block may be needed to manage extreme abdominal pain caused by pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. The majority of people who receive a pancreatic cancer diagnosis suffer from significant abdominal pain. Nine out of ten people with pancreatic cancer experience this pain eventually.

The pain is typically managed with strong pain medications prescribed by healthcare providers. Although these medications can be helpful, they can also cause unpleasant side effects such as nausea, constipation, and confusion. It may be possible to reduce your medication dose or amount with a celiac plexus block.

Over half of people suffer from pain even with medicine. Breakthrough pain can occur during periods of intense pain. In order to decrease the frequency of breakthrough pain, a celiac plexus block can be performed.

What steps should I take to prepare for a celiac plexus block?


If your healthcare provider has recommended anything before the procedure, follow their instructions. It may be necessary for you to stop taking certain medications, such as blood thinners. The procedure may require you to fast (not eat or drink) before it is performed. It is safer to undergo anesthesia on an empty stomach. It may also be necessary to cut back on alcohol and quit smoking. Complications are more likely to occur when these substances are consumed.

What happens during a celiac plexus block?


Despite the fact that the actual injections usually only take a few minutes, a nerve block procedure can take up to one hour. Celiac plexus blocks are outpatient procedures, so you can return home the same day. During the day, you should have someone stay with you and drive you home.

As you lie on your stomach with your hips propped up by a bolster (pillow), the procedure typically takes place. If lying on your stomach hurts too much, you may be able to lay on your back (supine position). A sedative will be administered intravenously to help you relax.

To guide the procedure, your healthcare provider will use fluoroscopy X-rays, CT scans, or endoscopic ultrasounds.

During the procedure, a local anesthetic is used to numb the treatment area after the area has been sterilized with an antiseptic. A small amount of contrast dye is then injected into the back to confirm the correct needle placement during imaging. Occasionally, you may feel a pinch and some discomfort. In order to numb the nerves, the doctor withdraws the needle and injects another needle with pain medicine (anesthetic) or steroids. An alcohol injection is then administered into the celiac plexus using a different needle (for a neurolytic procedure). Injections damage nerves, preventing the brain from receiving pain signals.

Celiac plexus block treatment is available at Jackson Pain Center. We serve patients from Jackson MS, Pearl MS, Ridgeland MS, Clinton MS, Byram MS, Richland MS, Florence MS, Madison MS, and Fondren MS.